Sudbury STREAM Training Practicum

Dates: September 17 - 18 2019
Times: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Eastern Time (ET)
Type: training
Cost: $375
Location: Sudbury, ON, Canada
Phone: 250-505-4311
Email: raegan@livinglakescanada.ca

This 2-day field practicum will be held in Sudbury, ON on September 17 & 18, 2019.

STREAM (Sequencing the Rivers for Environmental Assessment and Monitoring) DNA, is a new community-based project which involves the collection of samples for eDNA metabarcoding analysis from rivers across Canada. STREAM is a collaboration between Living Lakes Canada (LLC) World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the University of Guelph. The project is collaborating with interested partners including community and water stewardship groups, academia, Indigenous communities, all levels of government, and industry to collect data for stream health.

Living Lakes Canada Environmental Stewardship Initiative in Smithers, BC

This project uses an updated version of the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) protocol, developed by ECCC to collect samples using biomonitoring of benthic invertebrates, or the small animals on the bottom of the stream. Benthic invertebrates are strong indicators of water quality since the small organisms included in that group are highly sensitive to pollutants and other changes that impact aquatic ecosystem health.

For more information on levels of training, costs (price varies depending on level of certification), modules and other training locations visit the Canadian Rivers Institute.

Participants will be certified in the traditional CABIN protocol and learn new eDNA collection techniques. Trainees of CABiN gain access to a suite of web-accessible tools and resources, such as a national database of biological reference condition information, data management system, analytical software, and reporting tools.

Participants will also be supported to collect bulk DNA samples in their watersheds for the STREAM project post training.

To register: email Raegan Mallinson (raegan@livinglakescanada.ca)

Fort St. John/Dawson Creek STREAM Training Practicum

Dates: August 27 - 28 2019
Type: training
Location: Fort St. John/Dawson Creek area, BC, Canada
Phone: 250-505-4311
Email: raegan@livinglakescanada.ca

This 2-day field practicum will be held in the Fort St. John/Dawson Creek area on August 27 & 28, 2019. This training is currently CLOSED to the public. Please contact us at the end of July to find out if any spaces become available. 

STREAM (Sequencing the Rivers for Environmental Assessment and Monitoring) DNA, is a new community-based project which involves the collection of samples for eDNA metabarcoding analysis from rivers across Canada. STREAM is a collaboration between Living Lakes Canada (LLC) World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the University of Guelph. The project is collaborating with interested partners including community and water stewardship groups, academia, Indigenous communities, all levels of government, and industry to collect data for stream health.

Living Lakes Canada CABIN field course with Dene Kayeh Institute & Guardians.

This project uses an updated version of the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) protocol, developed by ECCC to collect samples using biomonitoring of benthic invertebrates, or the small animals on the bottom of the stream. Benthic invertebrates are strong indicators of water quality since the small organisms included in that group are highly sensitive to pollutants and other changes that impact aquatic ecosystem health.

For more information on levels of training, costs (price varies depending on level of certification), modules and other training locations visit the Canadian Rivers Institute.

Participants will be certified in the traditional CABIN protocol and learn new eDNA collection techniques.

Participants will be supported to collect bulk DNA samples in their watersheds for the STREAM project post training.

To register: email Raegan Mallinson (raegan@livinglakescanada.ca)

Canmore STREAM Training Practicum

Dates: July 16 - 17 2019
Times: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Mountain Time (MT)
Type: training
Cost: $375
Location: Canmore, AB, Canada
Phone: 250-505-4311
Email: raegan@livinglakescanada.ca

This 2-day field practicum will be held in Canmore, AB on July 16 & 17.

STREAM (Sequencing the Rivers for Environmental Assessment and Monitoring) DNA, is a new community-based project which involves the collection of samples for eDNA metabarcoding analysis from rivers across Canada. STREAM is a collaboration between Living Lakes Canada (LLC) World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the University of Guelph. The project is collaborating with interested partners including community and water stewardship groups, academia, Indigenous communities, all levels of government, and industry to collect data for stream health.

Living Lakes Canada CABIN field course with Dene Kayeh Institute & Guardians.

This project uses an updated version of the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) protocol, developed by ECCC to collect samples using biomonitoring of benthic invertebrates, or the small animals on the bottom of the stream. Benthic invertebrates are strong indicators of water quality since the small organisms included in that group are highly sensitive to pollutants and other changes that impact aquatic ecosystem health.

For more information on levels of training, costs (price varies depending on level of certification), modules and other training locations visit the Canadian Rivers Institute.

Participants will be certified in the traditional CABIN protocol and learn new eDNA collection techniques.

Participants will be supported to collect bulk DNA samples in their watersheds for the STREAM project post training.

To register: email Raegan Mallinson (raegan@livinglakescanada.ca)

Smithers STREAM Training Practicum

Dates: June 24 - 25 2019
Start Time: 8:00 am Pacific Time (PT)
Type: training
Location: Smithers, BC, Canada
Phone: 250-505-4311
Email: raegan@livinglakescanada.ca

The 2-day field practicum will be held in Smithers, BC June 24 & 25.

STREAM (Sequencing the Rivers for Environmental Assessment and Monitoring) DNA, is a new community-based project which involves the collection of samples for eDNA metabarcoding analysis from rivers across Canada. STREAM is a collaboration between Living Lakes Canada (LLC) World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the University of Guelph. The project is collaborating with interested partners including community and water stewardship groups, academia, Indigenous communities, all levels of government, and industry to collect data for stream health.

Living Lakes Canada CABIN field course with Dene Kayeh Institute & Guardians.

This project uses an updated version of the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) protocol, developed by ECCC to collect samples using biomonitoring of benthic invertebrates, or the small animals on the bottom of the stream. Benthic invertebrates are strong indicators of water quality since the small organisms included in that group are highly sensitive to pollutants and other changes that impact aquatic ecosystem health.

For more information on levels of training, costs (price varies depending on level of certification), modules and other training locations visit the Canadian Rivers Institute.

Participants will be certified in the traditional CABIN protocol and learn new eDNA collection techniques.

Participants will be supported to collect bulk DNA samples in their watersheds for the STREAM project post training.

To register: email Raegan Mallinson (raegan@livinglakescanada.ca)

WEBINAR: Elevating Community-Based Water Monitoring in Canada

Date: April 17, 2019
Start Time: 1:00 pm Eastern Time (ET)
Type: other
Cost: $0.00
Location: Online
Phone: 250-505-4311
Email: raegan@livinglakescanada.ca

Please join us for a presentation and discussion about the exciting outcomes of a year-long collaborative initiative designed to celebrate and promote community-based monitoring of freshwater ecosystems in across Canada. We are pleased to present final recommendations developed to identify actionable steps the federal government can take to show leadership and support in advancing community-based water monitoring (CBWM) in Canada.

During this webinar we’ll revisit the history and the process behind the initiative, dive into the recommendations and discuss next steps.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

 Ahead of the webinar, be sure to explore the final recommendations and discussion paper.

Nelson STREAM Training Practicum

Dates: June 12 - 13 2019
Start Time: 8:00 am Pacific Time (PT)
Type: training
Cost: $375
Location: Nelson, BC
Phone: 2505054311
Email: raegan@livinglakescanada.ca

STREAM (Sequencing the Rivers for Environmental Assessment and Monitoring) DNA, is a new community-based project which involves the collection of samples for eDNA metabarcoding analysis from rivers across Canada. STREAM is a collaboration between Living Lakes Canada (LLC) World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the University of Guelph. The project is collaborating with interested partners including community and water stewardship groups, academia, Indigenous communities, all levels of government, and industry to collect data for stream health.

This project uses an updated version of the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) protocol, developed by ECCC to collect samples using biomonitoring of benthic invertebrates, or the small animals on the bottom of the stream. Benthic invertebrates are strong indicators of water quality since the small organisms included in that group are highly sensitive to pollutants and other changes that impact aquatic ecosystem health.

For more information on levels of training, costs (price varies depending on level of certification), modules and other training locations visit the Canadian Rivers Institute.

Participants will be certified in the traditional CABIN protocol and learn new eDNA collection techniques.

Participants will be supported to collect bulk DNA samples in their watersheds for the STREAM project post training.

The 2-day CABIN field practicum will be held in Nelson, BC June 12 & 13.

To register: email Raegan Mallinson (raegan@livinglakescanada.ca)

Living Lakes Canada CABIN field course with Dene Kayeh Institute & Guardians

 

Learn to monitor stream health: CABIN training in Nelson, July 17-18

We all want healthy streams. Streams are living systems that affect the water we drink, the food we eat, the well-being of fish and wildlife, and the economy through fishing and other outdoor recreation.

Assessing the health of a stream can be done by counting the number of insects living in it — specifically, benthic macroinvertebrates (the backboneless bugs that are generally visible to the naked eye that live on the bottom of streams).

In Canada, a national protocol called CABIN (Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network) has been established that collects benthic macroinvertebrates and uses their counts as an indicator of a water body’s health.

Living Lakes Canada (LLC) is the only Canadian NGO trained by Environment and Climate Change Canada to train community groups, professionals, industry and First Nation communities in the CABIN methodology, which is the most widely used national protocol to assess the health of streams.

This summer, LLC will be holding a CABIN field practicum in Nelson, B.C. on July 17 and 18 that is open to the public.

Living Lakes Canada CABIN training in Nelson in 2017.

“Community-based water monitoring (CBM) is emerging across Canada as an untapped potential to help solve pressing challenges associated with watershed management,” said LLC Water Stewardship Lead Raegan Mallinson. “Living Lakes Canada trains citizen scientists in community-based monitoring because citizens are concerned and want to ensure that their lakes, rivers, wetlands and watersheds remain healthy and that their communities are climate resilient. They want to be involved in the decisions that affect their local watersheds including source water protection, drinking water quality, resource development and sustainable water and land use.”

Living Lakes Canada learns from experience in the field and through mentoring from Canada’s top water scientists to develop and deliver successful citizen science, community-based water monitoring initiatives. Indigenous communities have been monitoring or “watching the land and water” for generations by collecting observations combined with traditional knowledge passed on from Elders. Both indigenous and non-indigenous community-based water monitoring present enormous and cost-effective opportunities to empower communities to work collaboratively with governments and industry for holistic water management.

“The CABIN training program provides the knowledge and skills required to conduct a biomonitoring program to CABIN standards,” said Raegan.

Participants who receive CABIN training take part in a two-day CABIN field practicum that provides instruction for the standardized data collection techniques. Depending on the level of training that the participant chooses to undergo — from Field Technician to Program Manager — various modules are required to access and use the CABIN database. The CABIN database provides trainees with tools to store and manage their data and studies, and a suite of online analysis and reporting tools.

“Join us in the streams of the West Kootenay to learn how to create and carry out your own biomonitoring program to assess the health of your surrounding freshwater ecosystems,” said Raegan.

For more information on CABIN training levels, modules, cost and to register for LLC’s Nelson CABIN training, visit http://canadianriversinstitute.com/training/cabin/; and visit the Nelson CABIN training event page on Facebook here.

Living Lakes Canada CABIN training in Parksville in 2017.

Join us for a Groundwater Workshop at Wings 2018

What is groundwater and why do we monitor it?

Discover why groundwater monitoring is vital to community planning in the face of climate change in this Wings Over the Rockies workshop.

Living Lakes Canada’s Raegan Mallinson and Invermere area volunteer Buzz Harmsworth collecting groundwater data for the Columbia Basin Groundwater Monitoring Program. Photo by Heather Leschied

Groundwater, one of our most important yet least known natural resources, will be explored during an illuminating workshop at this year’s Wings Over the Rockies festival.

According to the 2017 Columbia Basin Trust report Water Monitoring and Climate Change in the Upper Columbia Basin: A Summary of Current Status and Opportunities by Dr. Martin Carver, the effects of climate change on groundwater resources in the Columbia Basin remains unclear due a lack of mapping, monitoring, and analysis.

On May 11 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Pynelogs Cultural Centre in Invermere, join Living Lakes Canada and Canadian geophysicist/engineer Paul Bauman for a discussion on the interconnectedness of groundwater within our global system.

During the workshop, learn about aquifers in the Columbia Basin, the Columbia Basin Groundwater Monitoring Program (the first citizen science groundwater monitoring program in B.C.), other water monitoring initiatives, and how groundwater relates to the new Water Sustainability Act.

This is also an opportunity to tell us about your water source and any related concerns to help Living Lakes Canada develop and expand the Columbia Basin Groundwater Monitoring Program.

“Given climate change, we expect groundwater to become an even more important resource, both as source water for humans and as a contributor to base river flows in times of drought,” says Living Lakes Canada Groundwater Monitoring Program Manager Carol Luttmer.

The workshop will not only pinpoint groundwater investigations taking place here in the Columbia Basin, but also in far-flung Northern Uganda where Paul Bauman, a Living Lakes Canada advisor, was part of a team to train the local people how to repair and maintain their water systems after two decades of civil war.

The cost of the workshop is just $15.

To register for “Connections Down Under – Groundwater in the Columbia Basin & Beyond with Paul Bauman & Carol Luttmer”, visit https://www.wingsovertherockies.org/events/event-details/connections-down-under—groundwater-in-the-columbia-basin-_-beyond-with-paul-bauman,-heather-leschied-_-carol-luttmer/663 and select “Book Now”.

If you would like more information or to discuss groundwater monitoring in your community, contact Carol directly at carol@livinglakescanada.ca.

A “hands-on” education project to train Ugandan students to look for water in the most desperate of the Acholi villages in Gulu district, as well as to train Acholi students, led by Calgary, AB geophysicist Paul Bauman, supported by five geophysicist volunteers from Alberta, The Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG,) Geoscientists Without Borders (GWB) Foundation, IsraAID. Paul Bauman

Water Data Hub Dialogue exceeds all expectations

On November 29 & 30, residents, guests and water experts gathered in Invermere, B.C. to discuss current water monitoring initiatives and water data storage hubs used in B.C., Canada and in the USA, and what the next steps are towards developing a collaborative water monitoring framework and data hub for the Columbia Basin.

The event — A Water Data Hub Dialogue: Cracking the Code in 3D — focused on two days of learning, sharing, and creative brainstorming amongst scientists, government, industry, community groups, First Nations, and technology experts with the goal of moving toward integrating the region’s water knowledge through freely accessed open source data and applied decision making.

Thank you to everyone who attended and contributed to this energizing and ambitiously successful event. A special thank you to Shuswap Band Chief Barb Cote and Akisqnuk First Nation Chief Alfred Joseph of the Ktunaxa Nation for welcoming us to their shared Traditional Territory.

Click here for a video of the Women’s Warrior Song welcome by members of the Shuswap Band (the song starts at the 0:46 second mark).

Some of what we have heard so far from the water dialogue attendees:

  • “Surprising mix of diverse expert presenters. Exceeded all expectations. Wonderful to see that so much of this work is already underway.”
  • “I will advocate for and help educate people about the Data Hub and its benefits, and get as many organizations in my community interested and involved as I can. I don’t make decisions regarding funding available, but will dedicate time and effort to keep my community involved in this important initiative.”
  • “Great couple of days. Very good speakers and very well organized.”
  • “Great job. Lots of information, partnerships and collaboration. Good initial planning for a great framework”
  • “Wow, excellent summaries, input and synthesis. Volunteer efforts of people stepping up to collect input is fabulous! Nice approach.”

A full proceeding of the dialogue including speaker presentations, breakout session brainstorming, survey results and next steps will be available mid-January.

To review live coverage of the dialogue including photos of slides and guest speaker quotes, visit Living Lakes Canada on Twitter and the event hashtag #WaterDataHub2017.

We would like to thank Pat Morrow for capturing the two-day conference. To view our photo albums, find Living Lakes Canada on Facebook and or go directly to the online albums “Cracking the Code in 3D Day 1” and “Cracking the Code in 3D Day 2”.

 

Photo by Pat Morrow

Living Lakes Canada’s Stewardship Lead in Colombia sharing community-based water monitoring experiences

Living Lakes Canada Water Stewardship Lead Raegan Mallison with two Colombian Watershed Keepers and Gila Somers from the NWT government in Colombia at the National Watershed Forum November 14-16

A Colombian national forum was held in the city of Pereira from November 14-16, 2017 with the participation of 50 watershed keepers from across the country, and Living Lakes Canada’s Raegan Mallinson attended and presented at the conference. The conference was part of the Colombian Ministry of the Environment and Sustainable Development (MADS in Spanish) programming to support watershed management and monitoring by engaging regional and local watershed advisors (Consejeros de Cuencas).

The agenda featured presentations on the role of watershed keepers and Community-Based Monitoring (CBM) and the challenges that are faced in various regions of the country, as well as sessions to initiate collaboration among the range of forum participants.

As the Water Stewardship Lead for Living Lakes Canada, Raegan was at the forum to provide hands-on knowledge of what it takes to carry out effective community-based monitoring. She shared recent developments including Living Lakes Canada’s role in the national freshwater citizen science program using environmental DNA with the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network protocol in partnership with Environment and Climate Change Canada, the University of Guelph and WWF-Canada.

Following the forum, she is meeting with water monitors and community members in the Putumayo department to exchange experiences on CBM, including approaches that interweave Traditional Knowledge, such as Living Lakes Canada’s Pilot Project on the integration of traditional language with the national CABIN protocol, as well as cultural, social and environmental perspectives faced by vulnerable populations.

The mission is also anticipated to provide valuable information to Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Embassy in Colombia related to community involvement in decision-making with a focus on environment management, governance and decision-making directly involving women, youth and vulnerable populations.

Check back for a summary of Raegan’s experiences when she returns to Canada November 25.

With the support of